New PDF release: “All Sturm and no Drang”: Beckett and Romanticism: Beckett

Long ago few a long time there were scattered efforts to handle the subject of Beckett and Romanticism, however it continues to be tough to fathom his ambiguous and slightly paradoxical angle towards this era in literature, tune and paintings background.

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New PDF release: “All Sturm and no Drang”: Beckett and Romanticism: Beckett

Some time past few many years there were scattered efforts to handle the subject of Beckett and Romanticism, however it is still tricky to fathom his ambiguous and just a little paradoxical angle towards this era in literature, song and paintings heritage.

Extra resources for “All Sturm and no Drang”: Beckett and Romanticism: Beckett at Reading 2006 (Samuel Beckett Today/Aujourd’hui, Volume 18)

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3 That shadow alerts us to the relation between transgression, expiation and narrative act which is as strongly figured in “The Ancient Mariner” as in any Beckett text. And, despite the apodictic statement in Coleridge’s 1800 Argument (“many and strange Judgements”), it is no less ambiguous in its nature. Coleridge’s notebook entry dated 30 October 1800 further suggests the intimacy of recursion in writing with both impotence and the obscure experience of obligation: “He knew not what to do – something, he felt, must be done – he rose, drew his writing-desk suddenly before him – sate down, took the pen – & found that he knew not what to do” (Coleridge 1957, 834).

A Samuel Beckett Chronology (Houndmills, Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006). Perry, Seamus, Coleridge and the Uses of Division (Oxford: Clarendon P, 1999). Rauber, D. , “The Fragment as Romantic Form,” in Modern Language Quarterly 30 (1964), 212-21. Reed, Arden, “The Mariner Rimed,” in Romanticism and Language, ed. Arden Reed (London: Methuen, 1984), 168-201. Rosen, Charles, The Romantic Generation (London: Fontana P, 1999). Shenker, Israel, “An Interview with Samuel Beckett (1956),” In Samuel Beckett: The Critical Heritage, ed.

Cf. Wheeler: “Since the verse text as a whole is explicitly about both the tale and the telling, it becomes itself tainted by the never-ending repetition: the telling is never finished, and, as a result, neither is the verse text. […] [I]n its unity the work of art is at the same time a fragment” (1981, 45). 3. For a post-structuralist perspective, see Eilenberg, especially 47-53. 4. Cf. Stillinger on Coleridge’s revision: “Perhaps he kept changing his texts to show that he was not dead” (117).

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